List of Nigerian presidents till date

Spread the love

This is a list of the heads of state of Nigeria, from Nigeria‘s independence in 1960 to the present.

Chief Dr Benjamin Nnamdi Azikiwe (1963 to 1966)

nnamdi-azikiwe-list-of-nigerian-presidents

Nnamdi Azikiwe, PC, usually referred to as “Zik”, was a Nigerian statesman who was Governor General of Nigeria from 1960 to 1963 and the first President of Nigeria from 1963 to 1966. Considered a driving force behind the nation’s independence, he came to be known as the “father of Nigerian Nationalism”.

2. Major General Johnson Thomas Aguiyi-Ironsi (January 1966 to July 1966)

Aguiyi-Ironsi: Echoes of January 1966 coup - Latest Nigeria News ...

Aguiyi-Ironsi had unarguably one of the briefest tenure as president, ruling for only 194 days – second only to Ernest Shonekan’s 83 days in office. Gen Aguiyi-Ironsi was an Ibo by Ethnicity and was Nigeria’s First military head of state. He had joined the army at a young age of 18 and served the Nigerian army for 42 years. After several promotions, he was appointed at the commandant of the entire UN peace keeping forces in the Congo in 1964. He was subsequently promoted to the exalted rank of major general, becoming the first Nigerian army officer to become a general officer Commanding, GOC of the entire Nigerian Army.

Before becoming president, Aguiyi-Ironsi had become very popular courtesy of the Legend of the Crocodile Mascot. The legend had it that Aguiyi-Ironsi had a swagger staff engraved with a crocodile mascot which made him invulnerable and that it was used to deflect bullets when he commanded a UN peacekeeping mission in Congo.

Aguiyi-Ironsi became head of state by seizing power during the ensuing chaos of the 15 January 1966 military coup d’etat. He served as the Head of state until he was ousted in a counter coup in July by mutinous northern army officers.

General Yakubu Dan-Yumma Gowon (1966 to 1975)

Nigerian Heroes and Their Contributions [Updated] ▷ Legit.ng

General Yakubu “Jack” Gowon (born 19 October 1934) is a Nigerian political and military leader who served as the head of state of Nigeria from 1966 to 1975. He ruled during the deadly Nigerian Civil War, which resulted in the death of 3 million people, most which were civilians.

4. General Murtala Rufai Ramat Mohammed (1975 to 1976)

You are here: Home / Politics / List of all Nigerian Presidents from 1960 till date 2019

List of all Nigerian Presidents from 1960 till date 2019

5SHARESShareTweet

Every Nigerian citizen will always cherish understanding historical events in Nigeria, how it all started and why we are here today. This is why we have compiled a comprehensive list of all Nigerian leaders from 1960 till date for you.

Sir Abubakar Tafawa

tafawa-balewa-first-prime-minster

Today is independence day, this is the exact first word of Sir Abubakar Tafawa Belewa as he passionately read out Nigeria’s historic independent day speech. His words were of great significance, it was the heralding of a new dawn. After decades of colonial rule the British Crown had finally relinquished authority to Nigeria.

Sir Abubakar Tafawa alongside Queen Elizabeth II then ruled Nigeria as the first prime minister until 1963 when Nigeria became a Republic. It was not until 3 years later in 1963 that Nigeria had her first democratically elected head of State. Up to now, Nigeria has had a total of 15 leaders.

Names and photos of all Nigerian Heads of States from 1960 to 2019

If you were not aware, Queen Elizabeth II was the head of state in Nigeria and was also the Queen of Nigeria before the Nigeria’s independence in 1960. From those who ascended through the ballot to those who clinched the position through the barrel, here is a list of all presidents of Nigeria since independence.

1. Chief Dr Benjamin Nnamdi Azikiwe (1963 to 1966)

nnamdi-azikiwe-list-of-nigerian-presidents

Fondly called “the great Zik of Africa”, Chief Dr Benjamin Nnamdi Azikiwe was the first president of a newly Independent Nigeria. Azikiwe an Ibo by ethnicity was born in the Northern city of Zungeru and unlike some of his peers spoke the three major language of Ibo, Hausa and Yoruba fluently.

Before venturing into politics, Azikiwe was widely regarded as a true bred nationalist. This image was pivotal in helping him maintain a perception of fairness later in government. Alongside Herbert Macaulay, he co-founded the National Council of Nigeria and Cameroon and was previously an active member of the Nigerian Youth Movement (NYM).

One of his greatest achievements was the promulgation of the 1963 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. He was also a successful journalist with over 12 different African newspapers under his belt. He served as president until he was ousted in a coup.

2. Major General Johnson Thomas Aguiyi-Ironsi (January 1966 to July 1966)

aguyi-ironsi-nigerian-president

Aguiyi-Ironsi had unarguably one of the briefest tenure as president, ruling for only 194 days – second only to Ernest Shonekan’s 83 days in office. Gen Aguiyi-Ironsi was an Ibo by Ethnicity and was Nigeria’s First military head of state. He had joined the army at a young age of 18 and served the Nigerian army for 42 years. After several promotions, he was appointed at the commandant of the entire UN peace keeping forces in the Congo in 1964. He was subsequently promoted to the exalted rank of major general, becoming the first Nigerian army officer to become a general officer Commanding, GOC of the entire Nigerian Army.

Before becoming president, Aguiyi-Ironsi had become very popular courtesy of the Legend of the Crocodile Mascot. The legend had it that Aguiyi-Ironsi had a swagger staff engraved with a crocodile mascot which made him invulnerable and that it was used to deflect bullets when he commanded a UN peacekeeping mission in Congo.

Aguiyi-Ironsi became head of state by seizing power during the ensuing chaos of the 15 January 1966 military coup d’etat. He served as the Head of state until he was ousted in a counter coup in July by mutinous northern army officers.

3. General Yakubu Dan-Yumma Gowon (1966 to 1975)

gowon

General Yakubu Gowon came to power through the coup d’etat and left through coup d’etat. Born in 19 October 1934, he was an indigene of law, a small village in present day plateau state. He joined the Nigerian army in 1954 and was commissioned a second lieutenant at the young age of 21. His administration was mired by the devastating effects of the Nigerian civil war.

Though he is usually credited with being pivotal in the reconstruction and reconciliation of the country after the civil war, he committed political flops during his administration.

One of his greatest dangles in power was his indigenization decree of 1972. The controversial degree effectively placed an economic embargo on foreign investment in some sectors of the Nigerian economy. Among his other political miscalculations were his refusal to transit to civilian rule and the cement Armada of 1975. The cement Armada occurred when his government ordered 20 million tons of cement to be delivered at the Lagos port which had capacity to handle only one million tons yearly. Lagos port was then inaccessible to ships with basic commodities due to an endless cluster of hundreds of ships waiting to offload cement.

4. General Murtala Rufai Ramat Mohammed (1975 to 1976)

murtala-mohammed-nigerian-president

Like most Nigerian leaders of his time, General Murtala Mohammed came to power through a coup d’etat. Coup plotters overthrew the then Head of State, Yakubu Gowon while attending an OAU submit in distant Kampala on 29 July 1975, subsequently announcing Murtala Mohammed as the new military ruler.

He was the Head of the Federal Military Government from 1975 until his assassination in 1976. Spending a total of only 200 days, he took series of decision, considered one of the most important decisions of any previous governments and was subsequently christened a national Hero. He is credited with instituting plans to relocate the capital territory from then overcrowded Lagos to Abuja. He also created seven more states in February 1976 including Bauchi, Benue, Borno, Imo, Niger, Ogun, and Ondo.

General Olusegun Mathew Okikiola Aremu Obasanjo (1976 to 1979)

Olusegun Obasanjo's Net Worth in 2020 and Biography ⋆ QIB Nigeria

Chief Olusegun Matthew Okikiola Aremu Obasanjo, GCFR, (/oʊˈbɑːsəndʒoʊ/; Yoruba: Olúṣẹ́gun Ọbásanjọ́ [olúʃɛ̙́ɡũ ɒ̙básandʒɒ̙́]; born 5 March 1937) is a Nigerian military and political leader who served as military head of state from 1976 to 1979 and later as President of Nigeria from 1999 to 2007.

6. Shehu Usman Aliyu Shagari (1979 to 1983)

Breaking: Nigeria's Former President, Shehu Shagari dies at 93 ...

Shehu Shagari was the first president of Nigeria’s second republic after General Olusegun Obasanjo fulfilled his promise of handing power over to a civilian government . He was born on February 25, 1925 in the Shagari village of Sokoto State, in then Nigeria Protectorate.

Major General Muhammadu Buhari (1983 to 1985)

Throwback Thursday Buhari has been fighting corruption since 1984 ...

Muhammadu Buhari GCFR (born 17 December 1942) is a Nigerian politician currently serving as the President of Nigeria, in office since 2015. Buhari is a retired military general of the Nigerian Army and previously served as military head of state from 1983 to 1985, after taking power in a military coup d’état.

General Ibrahim Gbadamosi Babangida (1985 to 1993)

Ibrahim Babagida - Politicians Data

General Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida (born 17 August 1941) popularly known as IBB, is a Nigerian statesman and military general who served as military President of Nigeria from 1985 until his resignation in 1993. He also served as the Chief of Army Staff from January 1984 to August 1985.

Chief Ernest Adegunle Oladeinde Shonekan (August 1993 to November 1993)

BREAKING NEWS: Ex-Head of State Ernest Shonekan reported dead ...

He was an experienced businessman with a large network of alliances and was generally considered politically neutral. His neutrality and experience was what made Babangida appoint him an interim leader.

During the 3 months of his administration, he laid plans for the return of democracy and the withdrawal of Nigerian troops from the peace keeping mission in Liberia. He is also credited with releasing political prisoners detained by the Ibrahim Babangida administration.

Because of his perceived weakness in control of the military, General Sani Abacha, then defence secretary led a palace coup to oust Shonekan.

General Sani Abacha (1993 to 1998)

The de-facto President Sani Abacha's biography

Sani Abacha. pronunciation (help·info); 20 September 1943 – 8 June 1998) was a Nigerian statesman and military general who served as the head of state of Nigeria from 1993 until his death in 1998. He was also Chief of Army Staff between 1985 to 1990; Chief of Defence Staff between 1990 to 1993; and Minister of Defence.

General Abdulsalami Abubakar (1998 to 1999)

History Lesson: Nigeria's Past Presidents | Zikoko!

Abdulsalami Abubakar. listen); born June 13, 1942) is a Nigerian statesman and military general who served as the de facto President of Nigeria from 1998 to 1999. He was also Chief of Defence Staff between 1993 to 1998. He succeeded General Sani Abacha upon his death.

Chief Olusegun Mathew Okikiola Aremu Obasanjo (1999 to 2007)

Philip Obin on Twitter: "Chief Olusegun Mathew Okikiola Aremu ...

Chief Olusegun Matthew Okikiola Aremu Obasanjo, GCFR, (/oʊˈbɑːsəndʒoʊ/; Yoruba: Olúṣẹ́gun Ọbásanjọ́ [olúʃɛ̙́ɡũ ɒ̙básandʒɒ̙́]; born 5 March 1937) is a Nigerian military and political leader who served as military head of state from 1976 to 1979 and later as President of Nigeria from 1999 to 2007

Umaru Musa Yar’Adua (2007 to 2010)

Our President: Biography of Alhaji Umaru Musa Yar'Adua

Umaru Musa Yar’Adua was the 13th president of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. He was governor of Katsina State in northern Nigeria from 29 May 1999 to 28 May 2007. He was declared the winner of the controversial Nigerian presidential election held on 21 April 2007, and was sworn in on 29 May 2007.

Goodluck Ebele Azikiwe Jonathan (2010 to 2015)

Goodluck Jonathan Net Worth 2020>In DOLLARS & NAIRA

Goodluck Jonathan’s rise to power is always attributed by many to sheer “Goodluck.” Series of favorable political events propelled him to the position of state governor and then president.

On 10th February 2010, Nigerian parliamentarians controversially invoked the “doctrine of necessity” to transfer presidential powers to Goodluck Jonathan, then vice president under Yar’Adua effectively declaring him Acting President. Prior to this Goodluck Jonathan wasn’t a major player in the national scene. However, the parliaments perceived approval gave him confidence to subsequently contest for and win the 2011 presidential election.

Muhammadu Buhari (2015 till date)

Nigeria's new president Muhammadu Buhari faces an uphill battle | Time

A military dictator turned democrat, president Buhari staged an Abraham Lincoln style comeback to the presidency by defeating Goodluck Jonathan in the 2015 presidential election. He had previously contested and lost miserably for three times before emerging as the candidate of the APC – a coalition of several opposition parties.

He clinched historic victory in the March 28 election, effectively becoming the first opposition candidate to defeat an incumbent president.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *